Jan 282020
 

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  4 Responses to “Making and Risk-Taking”

  1. It doesn’t surprise me that an article about building rockets would mention SpaceX, but you are quite right about the idolization of Elon Musk in general. He has become a lightning rod for “self made maker” types, especially those with an abundance of resources themselves. A connection I would’ve made with this is the financial burden associated with this culture.
    On page 245 Nguyen mentions a plasma cutter, “A household can opt for a $3,000 plasma cutter rather than the $20,000 version, if on a budget” the idea that everybody has $3,000, much less $20,000, lying around for some tool is ridiculous. Those creating on budgets like that undermine the heart of DIY by making it more expensive to do yourself, rather than using actual household items they seek to make industrial tech into household items themselves. Even if their utopian maker world could exist without the numerous other problems, creativity would become a luxury that only the wealthy could afford.

  2. These physical and ideological risks that Nguyen speaks on such as “harmful chemicals” make sense to be monitored by the parent or guardian of the child, but do you agree with the argument from Bernard Stiegler stating “the primary responsibility of adulthood is responsibility for the young”? I think obviously as adults we should care for the young, but I think a greater responsibility we have is to everyone and just trying to make the world a better place. This, in turn, makes a better enviroment for the young to grow up in, which turns around a becomes a repating process.
    With the icon that Elon Musk has become in the younger generations, I am not surprised that they name-dropped his company. They most likely did this for more “clicks” or engagements for the post. Like you said the silicon valley holds the technology sector to a higher standard. I think this sometimes holds the children to a higher standard than sometimes can be unhealthy. If you come from silicon valley it is almost expected for you to be a tech wiz.

  3. These physical and ideological risks that Nguyen speaks on such as “harmful chemicals” make sense to be monitored by the parent or guardian of the child, but do you agree with the argument from Bernard Stiegler stating “the primary responsibility of adulthood is responsibility for the young”? I think obviously as adults we should care for the young, but I think a greater responsibility we have is to everyone and just trying to make the world a better place. This, in turn, makes a better environment for the young to grow up in, which turns around a becomes a repeating process.
    With the icon that Elon Musk has become in the younger generations, I am not surprised that they name-dropped his company. They most likely did this for more “clicks” or engagements for the post. Like you said the silicon valley holds the technology sector to a higher standard. I think this sometimes holds the children to a higher standard than sometimes can be unhealthy. If you come from silicon valley it is almost expected for you to be a tech wiz.

  4. Hi Emily,
    Here are some comments about your work:
    You have done a good job in explaining your selection of arguments from the reading and researching further on the Make magazine. Your analysis of the article complements your thoughts about making culture. Make sure the visual you use in your blogpost gives the readers useful information that relates to your text. You can think of a screenshot of the article on rockets as a better option.

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