Fall 2013 Course Materials

 

Syllabus

Fashioning Circuits
EMAC 4372: Topics in Emerging Media and Communication
Fall 2013
These descriptions and timelines are subject to change at the discretion of the Instructor.

Course Information

Meets: TR 10am – 11:15am
Location: ATC 2.918
Credit Hours: 3

Contact Information

Instructor: Kim Knight

Email (preferred method of contact): kim.knight@utdallas.edu
Twitter: @purplekimchi
Phone: 972-883-4346. No voicemail, please.

Office: ATC 1.903 (East wing, near silver elevators)
Office Hours:
Kim’s office hours

TA: Harrison Massey

Email: harrisonm@utdallas.edu
Twitter: @iamaboutus
Harrison’s office hours

  • Beginning November 5: Tuesday and Thursday 12pm – 5pm. Monday by appointment.

Course website: http://fashioningcircuits.com
Twitter tag: #fashioningcircuits
Fashioning Circuits Github organization: https://github.com/fashioning-circuits
Twitter archive for #fashioningcircuits

Course Description

Fashion and emerging media have more in common than one might think. Both are constantly in flux and looking forward. Both are sites to negotiate and express identity. Both value originality, but also thrive on collaboration and appropriation. The two are explicitly combined in the realm of wearable media, which will be the main focus of this course. We will begin with a brief look at the history of fashion and its historical intersections with media and technology. We will then explore more contemporary areas of intersection centered on issues of identity and globalization. The final portion of the semester will be devoted to “learning by doing” in the production of socially-engaged and critically-informed wearable media projects. No sewing, electronics, or coding experience is necessary.

Course Goals

In this course, students will:

  • Become familiar with the basic social and ethical issues that connect fashion and emerging media.
  • Write critical analysis of fashion and media theories and practices.
  • Become familiar with the basic concepts of electronic circuitry, wearable arduino hardware, and the arduino programming language.
  • Produce two wearable media objects. No prior sewing, electronics, or coding experience required.

Required Textbooks and Materials

  • Rebecca Arnold Fashion: A Very Short Introduction ISBN 978-0199547906
  • Tony Olsson, David Gaetano, Samson Wiklund, Jonas Odhner, OpenSoftwear
    • 1st edition available as a free download at http://softwear.cc/book/files/Open_Softwear-beta090712.pdf
  • All items from the following wishlist:
    • https://www.sparkfun.com/wish_lists/64326
    • SparkFun is going to provide a 20% off coupon with a September 10 expiration date. The coupon code will be distributed in class.
    • Substitute any led color of your choice. Avoid micro-leds as those will require extra resistors. Be aware that the purple leds are very faint.
    • This is all of the electronic components you will need for your first wearable media project and all hands-on exercises. You may also be able to use much of this in your final project, particularly the Lilypad Simple board. However, you may need to purchase additional supplies to realize your vision.
  • Fabric and other sewing materials, TBD

Various chapters and essays, available online or through course reserve.  The username for protected downloads on kimknight.com is “emac4372” and the password is “fashion”. The password for protected downloads on course reserves is “fashion”.

You will also need the following:

  • a UTD email account (that you check at least once per day)
  • a public Twitter account http://twitter.com
  • a GitHub account http://github.com
  • an account on http://fashioningcircuits.com

Recommended Textbooks and Materials

  • Banzi, Massimo. Getting Started with Arduino. ISBN 978-0-596-15551-3
  • Michael Margolis, Arduino Cookbook ISBN 1449313876
    • the library has two electronic copies of this book

Course Policies

Attendance:

It is important that you come to our meetings prepared and on time. To be “prepared” means that you have thoughtfully engaged with the reading and are prepared to discuss it, and that you have done any creative pre-work necessary.  Bring questions, comments, observations, disagreements, examples, etc.

Because your presence is important, absences can negatively affect your grade. I do not differentiate between excused and unexcused absences. You are allowed to miss two classes (ie 1 week of class), for whatever reason, with no effect on your participation grade. Three or more absences will negatively impact your participation grade. Eight or more absences (i.e. missing one month of class) will, in most cases, result in a failing grade.  Absences for religious purposes do not count against the permitted number (as long as at least two weeks notification is given). Lateness is also unacceptable; if you arrive more than thirty minutes late you will be marked as absent. Leaving more than 30 minutes early also counts as an absence. In addition, please try to be as fully present and engaged as possible – silence cell phones, don’t send or receive texts or emails, etc.  Excessive distraction may be counted as an absence.

Accommodation:

If you would like to request accommodation due to a disability, please let me know as soon as possible.  The disability must be documented with the Office of Student AccessAbility at UTD.

Online Due Dates:

All online assignments are due by 11:59pm on the date listed, unless otherwise noted.

Late work:

Late work will not be accepted. It is your responsibility to complete your work early enough to allow time for any technical difficulties.

Respectful behavior:

Our many discussions and online assignments will require vigilance to ensure that we are always preserving an atmosphere of mutual respect. Disagreements may arise and consensus may not be possible. We can, however, respect each person’s right to express an opinion. Name calling, harassment, or menacing behavior will not be tolerated.

Online identity:

This class asks students to participate in publicly accessible blogs and other forms of public writing. Writing in public has several advantages for student learning. It creates a closer analogue to offline environments, and allows for the creation of writing that is designed to be shared with an audience beyond the instructor. It also allows students to learn from each other. However, some students may have legitimate privacy concerns about participating in publicly accessible assignments. These students may choose to participate in public assignments under a pseudonym, or assumed name. If you wish to request this accommodation for any reason, please contact me immediately.

Academic Honesty:

From the UT-D Handbook of Operating Procedures: “The university expects from its students a high level of responsibility with respect to academic honesty. Because the value of an academic degree depends on the absolute integrity of the work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that a student maintain a high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work. The dean may initiate disciplinary proceedings under subchapter C against a student accused of scholastic dishonesty upon complaint by a faculty member or a student.” (http://www.utdallas.edu/dept/graddean/gsPolDishonesty.htm)

Academic dishonesty will be reported to the office of the Dean of Students and may result in  disciplinary action by the university. If you have any questions regarding the proper use of outside sources or the distinction between sampling and plagiarism, I encourage you to meet with me.

University Policies:

Please visit http://go.utdallas.edu/syllabus-policies for the University’s policies regarding all courses.

Course Requirements and Grading Policy

Grading Scale:

 

A Range: Excellent. All work is thought-provoking and well-executed. B Range: Above Average. Most work is thought-provoking and well-executed. C Range: Average. Most work is well-executed. D Range: Poor. Work is often neither thought-provoking, nor well-executed. F Range:Failing.Work fails to meet college standards.
A, A-  B+, B, B- C+, C, C-   D+, D, D-   F

Participation – 30%

Participation includes attendance, in-class and online discussion, in-class quizzes, homework assignments, office hours visits, and sharing resources via Twitter. At least one office hours visit with Kim should be completed no later than Thursday, October 17.

Wearable Project 1 – 10%

Students will work individually to create a small-scale wearable media project from a pattern. The goal is to foster familiarity with electronics, coding, and sewing. Students will be evaluated on their willingness to engage in the process and the successful execution of the project.

Sewing & Electronics Exam – 10%

This take home exam will cover the basics of electronic circuitry and machine sewing.

Arduino Exam – 10%

This in-class exam will cover basic Arduino concepts related to sensors, actuators, and basic code.

Cool Hunting – 10%

To facilitate familiarity with the field and help seed ideas for the final project, students will blog approximately 300 words describing and critically analyzing a wearable media object (art piece, consumer product, or DIY project). Students will add their blog to the Fashioning Circuits blog and give a 7 – 10 minute presentation in which they summarize the object and their analysis.

Final Wearable Project  – 30%

Students will work individually or in groups to create a larger-scale, final wearable media project. The goal with this project is to move beyond basic familiarity and produce a project that draws upon our readings and attempts to make an intellectual statement or social intervention. Students will be evaluated on the idea, execution, and relationship between form and idea. The final project will include a proposal and a short paper.

General Requirements:

This class involves a lot of theoretical reading.  My hope is that you will apply the ideas from that reading to the world around you. You will be most successful in this class if you are able to have an open mind and take a critical approach to our topics.  Please note that being “critical” does not necessarily mean being negative, but it does mean that you are willing to question assumptions and explore the implications of the seemingly mundane and minute aspects of contemporary media culture.  Openness to experimentation and play and a willingness to try and fail are critical to the study of emerging media.  In short, in this class we will be enacting some of the very changes we are studying – collaborative learning, alternative models of scholarship, etc.

 

 

Schedule

Unit 1: Introduction Aug 27 – Sept 10

Tuesday, August 27 – Introduction

Thursday, August 29 –  Introduction to Lilypad Arduino

  • Reading
    • Open Softwear Ch 3 “Software” and Ch 4 “Using the IDE”
  • Homework
    • Complete syllabus scavenger hunt
    • Register for public Twitter account
    • Register for an account on http://fashioningcircuits.com
      • Once approved, create a page (not a post) under the parent page “Student Editors”
      • Copy the sample page
    • Install the arduino software on your computer; ensure you have the correct drivers for the lilypad ftdi connector

Tuesday, Sept 3 – Fashion, Clothing, and Cool

Thursday, Sept 5 – History of Fashion

Tuesday, Sept 10 – History of Fashion

  • Reading
    • Arnold, Rebecca. Fashion: A Very Short Introduction
      • Ch 4 – 6, Conclusion
  • Homework
  • Cool hunting
    • AJ

Unit 2: Fashion as Communication Sept 12 – Sept 28

Thursday, Sept 12 – Gender

Tuesday, Sept 17 – Race

Thursday, Sept 19 – Intro to GitHub

  • Reading
    • Meloni, “A Gentle Introduction to Version Control”
      • http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/a-gentle-introduction-to-version-control/23064
    • Carter, “The Everyday Developer’s Guide to Version Control with Git”
      • http://www.slideshare.net/erincarter/the-everyday-developers-guide-to-version-control-with-git
    • Lawson, Konrad
      • “Getting Started with a GitHub Repository”
        • http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/getting-started-with-a-github-repository/47393
      • “Direct Editing and Zen Mode in GitHub”
        • http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/direct-editing-and-zen-mode-in-github/47497
      • “Forks and Pull Requests in GitHub”
        • http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/forks-and-pull-requests-in-github/47753
      • “Files and Repository History in GitHub”
        • http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/file-and-repository-history-in-github/48047
    • Getting Started: Git Basics
      • http://git-scm.com/book/en/Getting-Started-Git-Basics
  • Homework

Tuesday, Sept 24 – Sexuality

  • Reading
    • Brennan, Samantha. “Fashion and Sexual Identity, or Why Recognition Matters” in Fashion: Philosophy for Everyone 120 – 134 (15 pps)
      • http://utdallas.docutek.com/eres/coursepage.aspx?cid=1536&page=docs
    • Edwards, Tim. “Express Yourself: The Politics of Dressing Up.” in Fashion in Focus 103 – 119 (17 pps)
      • http://utdallas.docutek.com/eres/coursepage.aspx?cid=1536&page=docs
  • Cool hunting
    • Amanda

Thursday, Sept 26 – Globalization

Unit Three: Fashion and Emerging Media Oct 1 – Nov 5

Tuesday, Oct 1 – Cybercoutoure

  • Reading
    • Quinn, Bradley. “Cybercouture” in Techno Fashion 77 – 96 (20 pps) There are multiple readings by this author. Make sure you get the correct one!

      • http://utdallas.docutek.com/eres/coursepage.aspx?cid=1536&page=docs
    • Pederson, Isabel. “MyLifeBits, Augmented Memory, and a Rhetoric of Need” in Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies. (12 pps)
      • http://libproxy.utdallas.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ufh&AN=31768664&site=ehost-live
      • (you will need to sign into the library by proxy or be on campus to access)
    • Playlist of Hussein Chalayan dresses
  • Cool hunting
    • Angie

Thursday, Oct 3 – Workshop

  • Reading
  • In-class: repeat lilypad rapid prototyping or basic circuit exercise; use a multi-meter
    • concepts: Voltage, amperes, resistance, Ohm’s Law

Tuesday, Oct 8 – Workshop

  • Meet in EMAC Lab, ATC 3.705 (northwest corner of the building)
  • Reading:
  • Bring
    • Wearable Project One supplies
  • In-class: introduction to fabric, cutting, and the sewing machines
    • fabric: selvedge, grain, bias
    • patterns, marking, cutting
    • parts of the machine; threading the machine; seating the bobbin; raising / lowering the needle; stitch selection

Thursday, Oct 10 – Project Workshop

  • Meet in EMAC Lab, ATC 3.705 (northwest corner of the building)
  • Reading
    • Open Softwear pps 76 – 82, 94 – 97
      • Basic structure, variables, void setup, void loop, brackets, semicolons, commenting code, variable types and declarations, the digital pins, the analog pins
  • In-class
    • sketch components; sew soft circuits using LilyTiny board, battery holder, and LEDs

Tuesday, Oct 15 –  Project Workshop

  • Meet in EMAC Lab, ATC 3.705 (northwest corner of the building)
  • In-class
    • continue sewing soft circuits; begin sewing wrist cuff

Thursday, Oct 17 –  Project Workshop

  • Meet in EMAC Lab, ATC 3.705 (northwest corner of the building)
  • In-class
    • finish sewing wrist cuff
  • Wearable Media Project 1 due
  • Last day for required office hours visit with Kim

Midterm grades: October 18

Saturday, October 19 – Design Your World Conference. Details announced. Check your email.

Tuesday, Oct 22 – Blogs & Videos

  • Cool hunting
    • Brandon

Thursday, Oct 24 – Workshop – buttons & switches

  • Reading
  • In-class
    • add button or switch to soft circuit

Tuesday, Oct 29 – Apps & Networked Fashion

  • Final Project proposal due

Thursday, Oct 31 – Workshop – LEDs Beyond Blinking

  • Reading
  • Bring to Class
    • Proto-snap kit, FTDI connector, USB cable
    • Wrist cuff if you are willing to loan it for display at building dedication next week
  • In-class
    • tri-color LEDs; serial vs. parallel LEDs; fade and forloopiteration;

Tuesday, Nov 5 – Smart Textiles

Unit Four: Arduino Nov 7 – Dec 10

Thursday, Nov 7 – Workshop –serial monitor and serial print

 

Tuesday, Nov 12 – Workshop – input via serial communication

  • Bring to class
    • Protosnap kit, FTDI connector, USB cable
  • In-class
    • connecting to RSS feeds, social media, etc.

Thursday, Nov 14 – Workshop – light and temperature sensors

  • Reading
    • OpenSoftwear Ch 9, section “Types” pps 82 – 85 (4 pps)
    • OpenSoftwear Ch 6 “Using Analog Pins” (8 pps)
  • Bring to Class
    • Proto-snap kit, FTDI connector, USB cable
    • Install Node.js (Click “Install” on http://nodejs.org/ and run the downloaded install file)
  • In-class
    • code for light and temperature sensors; if and if else; Other types of variables

Tuesday, Nov 19 – Workshop –vibe boards & buzzers

Thursday, Nov 21 – Arduino Exam

Nov 25 – 29: Fall Break

Tuesday, Dec 3 – Project workshop

Thursday, Dec 5 – Project workshop

Tuesday, Dec 10 – Project workshop

Final Exam Period Thursday, December 19, 11am – 1:45pm – Presentation of Wearable project 2

 

 

Assignments

 

Participation Assignment

EMAC 4372: Topics in Emerging Media and Communication
Fall 2013
Fashioning Circuits

Participation Assignment Sheet

Purpose

      • To involve students in active processes of learning in conjunction with course goals

Overview

Forget the model of education you see in the movies where a brilliant professor lectures from a podium and students scribble away furiously in their notebooks. Research evidence overwhelmingly suggests that students learn better and retain more information when they are actively involved in the process of learning.
My classroom philosophy is that I am a coach, there to guide you through these active processes. I very seldom lecture and most of our class meetings will involve whole class discussion. And this will lead to some of the most valuable take-away from this course, in class and online. However, this means that your participation is necessary for our success. It is important that you participate in every class meeting and that you share resources between classes.

Your participation grade includes in-class discussion, sharing resources via twitter, reading responses, attendance, in-class quizzes, and office hours visits.

The Requirements:

      • Do the reading. Take notes. Come to class prepared to discuss key ideas, vocabulary, questions, disagreements, examples, etc.
      • Be in class. More than two absences will affect your grade, and in most cases, eight or more absences will result in a failing grade.
      • Arrive on time and stay for the duration of the class session. If you arrive more than 30 minutes late, you will be marked as absent. Leaving more than 30 minutes early also counts as an absence.
      • Pay attention. Silence cell phones. Don’t send or receive texts or emails. Stay off of Facebook unless it is part of an in-class activity. Use workshop time to test new tools. Excessive distraction may be counted as an absence.
      • Share information. If you see articles or tweets relevant to the class, tweet them with the hashtag. Add new tools to the resource index pages.
      • You can use Twitter for in-class participation but try not to over-rely on it.

Technical Specifications

You will need a public Twitter account so that all of your peers can see your tweets and your tweets are included in searches for the class hashtag. You do not have to use your real name in your Twitter account, but you do need to give me your Twitter handle.

Grading

Participation is worth 30% of your final grade.

The criteria for grading your work are:

Excellent Good Satisfactory Needs Improvement Failing
In-class discussion The student always contributes meaningful comments and ideas to class discussion*. The student may additionally contribute to the in-class Tweet stream. The student consistently contributes comments and ideas to class discussion. Class discussion may be supplemented with in-class Twitter participation. The student often contributes comments and ideas to class discussion or supplements with in-class Twitter participation. The student rarely contributes comments and ideas to class discussion and may over-rely on Twitter in class. The student never contributes to class discussion or in-class Twitter.
Sharing resources The student tweets three or more times a week outside of class with information and ideas marked with the class hashtag. The student tweets a few times a week outside of class with information and ideas marked with the class hashtag. The student tweets at least once a week outside of class with information and ideas marked with the class hashtag. The student tweets less frequently than once per week outside of class with information and ideas marked with the class hashtag. The student never tweets information and ideas with the class hashtag.
Homework Assignments Homework assignments are completed on time and the student consistently draws connections between homework and other course materials. Homework assignments are completed on time and the student often draws connections between homework and other course materials. Homework assignments are completed on time and the student sometimes draws connections between homework and other course materials. Homework assignments may be late or the student may fail to connect them to other course materials. Homework assignments are often late or incomplete.

*Note: you do not always have to fully grasp the material to make meaningful comments. You may ask questions and make a good effort to understand.

Your participation grade will be negatively impacted if:

      • You have three or more absences.
      • You are consistently late or consistently leave early.
      • You are excessively distracted by other websites, your phone, etc.
      • You do not use workshop time effectively.
      • You do not complete at least one office hours visit with Kim (either during drop-in hours or by appointment) by October 17, 2013.
      • Your average score on the reading quizzes is fewer than three points.

Late Work: Work associated with participation may not be completed late.

 

Cool Hunting Assignment

EMAC 4372: Topics in Emerging Media and Communication
Fall 2013
Fashioning Circuits

Cool Hunting Assignment Sheet

Purpose:

      • To identify new developments and trends in the intersection between fashion and emerging media.
      • To perform critical analysis of fashion and media theories and practices.
      • To write for an audience interested in the course topics.
      • To seed ideas for the final project.

Overview:

As we move through the semester, you will want to be on the lookout for interesting examples of wearable media and electronic fashion. These can be garments, gadgets, textiles, apps, blogs, and other intersections between emerging media and fashion. As you find them, keep in mind that our goal is not simply to report on new developments but to analyze new developments within their technological and social contexts. Each week, different students will write and present cool hunting reports on one new development each.

Requirements:

      • Ensure that you are choosing something that has not already been written about on the blog.
      • Write a minimum of 300 words of description and analysis of your wearable tech object.
        • cite at least one source from the course readings.
        • post your cool hunting report to the Fashioning Circuits blog.
          • include any relevant images, video, or other media, but be sure to give attribution and use media according to the license.
          • select appropriate categories (broad groupings) and add appropriate tags (narrow content keywords)
        • use language and tone appropriate to an intelligent audience interested in developments in wearable media. Avoid being overly informal.
      • Give a 7-10 minute presentation that gives an overview of your topic and analysis.

Technical Specifications

      • All cool hunting reports posted to the Fashioning Circuits blog.

Grading Criteria

The cool hunting report is worth 10% of your course grade.

Excellent Good Satisfactory Needs Improvement Failing
Content The blog post is well-written and thought-provoking. The analysis deepens our understanding of wearable media and expertly addresses the “so what” question. The blog post is well-written and interesting. The analysis attempts to address the “so what” question. The blog post is well-written and the analysis is clearly connected to concepts from the course. The analysis indicates awareness of the “so what” question. The blog post may have a lot of errors or may fail to connect the object of analysis to ideas from the course. The blog post may have excessive errors or may be off topic.
Blog format The content is enhanced through use of the affordances of a blog post, such as visual media, tags, links, etc. All images and other materials are given proper attribution and used within the terms of their license. The content is supported through the use of the affordances of a blog post, such as visual media, tags, links, etc. All images and other materials are given proper attribution and used within the terms of their license. The content is connected to the affordances of a blog post, such as visual media, tags, links, etc. All images and other materials are given proper attribution and used within the terms of their license. The blog post may lack sufficient media and features that are part of the blog format, or they may be confusing or irrelevant. Images and other materials may not have attribution or may not be used according to their license. The student’s writing lacks any of the features of a blog post.
Presentation The presentation is dynamic and well-organized. The speaker clearly describes the development and helps the class understand the “so what” of the topic. The presentation is clear and engaging. The speaker speaker clearly describes the development and addresses the “so what” of the topic. The presentation is clear and the speaker gestures toward the “so what” of the topic. The presentation may lack clarity or the student may neglect the “so what” of the topic. The presentation lacks clarity.

The following will detract from your grade:

      • Failure to meet minimum length requirements
      • Failure to properly format the blog post.
      • Failure to present the cool hunting report to the class.
      • Evidence of a lack of preparation for the presentation, including time management.

Late Work

Work associated with the cool hunting assignment will not be accepted late.

Timeline and Due Dates.

    • Ongoing.
    • Cool hunting reports are due before class on the day that you are scheduled to present.

Wearable Project One

EMAC 4372: Topics In Emerging Media and Communication

Fashioning Circuits

Fall 2013

Wearable Media Project 1

Purpose:
  • To demonstrate proficiency in creating a soft circuit
  • To demonstrate proficiency with the sewing machine
  • To develop good troubleshooting habits

For the first wearable media project of the semester, our ambitions are modest. As a class we will work to all create the same project – the twinkling wrist cuff.

Supplies needed:
  • ¼ yard lightweight cotton fabric (Kim has some scraps available)
  • ¼ yard garment interfacing
  • 2 buttons
  • Matching non-conductive thread
    • if you are working with colors other than black or white: a bobbin for the machine
  • 2 small fabric coated elastic hairbands (Kim has some of these)
  • Fabric glue (optional; Kim has some)
  • LilyTwinkle DEV 11364
  • Lilypad coin cell battery holder – switched 20mm DEV 11285
  • Coin cell battery 20mm CR2032 PRT00338
  • 4 Lilypad LEDs
  • Conductive thread DEV 10867
  • Needle for hand sewing
Grading

Wearable Project One is worth 10% of your course grade.

Excellent Very Good Satisfactory  Needs Improvement  Failing
Circuit All components are properly connected and stitching is neat and precise. The circuit lights up properly. All components are properly connected. There is no danger of loose thread shorting the circuit. The circuit lights up properly.  All components are properly connected. Any loose thread has been insulated. The circuit lights up properly. All components are properly connected. Loose threads may be in danger of touching. The circuit may not light up. Components may not be properly connected. Stitching is poorly done and the circuit may not light up.
Sewing All seams are neatly sewn and threads are trimmed. Buttons are firmly and neatly attached. The finished piece has neat appearance. All seams are neatly sewn and threads are trimmed. Buttons are well- attached. The finished piece has a uniform appearance. All seams are sewn shut and the finished piece has a mostly uniform appearance. Buttons are attached. Seams may be messy or unfinished. Buttons may be loose or may not be attached using the prescribed method. The finished appearance may be irregular. Major seams are unfinished or the finished piece has a highly irregular appearance. Buttons may or may not be attached.
Troubleshooting The student engages in troubleshooting and is able to articulate and address the cause of any issues. The student engages in troubleshooting and is able to articulate or address the cause of any issues. The student engages in troubleshooting but can neither articulate nor address the cause of any issues. The student does not engage in troubleshooting.
Timeline and due dates:
  • In class workshops Oct 8 – 17
  • Finished wrist cuff is due Oct 17 (may require some take home work)
    • If you do not finish in class, you must send me pictures of your circuit and video of the lights working by 11:59pm
No late work will be accepted for this assignment.

Final Wearable Project

EMAC 4372: Topics in Emerging Media and Communication
Fashioning Circuits
Fall 2013
Wearable Project Two

Purpose

  • To solve a problem or make a statement about a social issue through wearable media
  • To practice sewing, electronics, and coding
  • To engage in project design and communication

You completed the first wearable media project and, as a result, have had some practice in sewing and electronics. For the second wearable project, the goal is to increase the intellectual rigor and move into more complex conceptual territory. Your second project should address a problem or signify something social or cultural.

Requirements:

  • It must be wearable in some way, though this can include jewelry, bags, and hats.
    • You may choose to sew the garment but it is not required.
  • The project should exhibit some complexity in design. This can be in components used, connection to external input, or the sewing and construction.
  • You can use the components of the LilyPad Protosnap kit or you may need to order additional supplies.
  • You may collaborate but the amount of work and complexity should reflect the size of your group.
  • Wearable Project Two consists of four stages: proposal, production, reflection, and presentation.
Proposal:

To ensure that you have comprehensively planned your project, you are required to submit a project proposal by end of day on Tuesday, October 29. The proposal should be added to your editor page on the Fashioning Circuits blog.

The required sections of the proposal are:

  1. Problem or Social Issue Being Addressed
  2. Description of Wearable Object
  3. What will it do? What will it look like? For whom is it designed?
  4. Design
    1. Include all hardware and software necessary to realize your vision. You may not know exactly which software or language you will use but you should be able to describe what you want it to do. How will the pieces function together?
  5. Anticipated Challenges / Areas of Concern
  6. Questions
Production

You will receive feedback on your proposal. Once you receive this feedback, order your supplies and start working. You are encouraged to document your project at all stages with photos, videos, and notes.

Reflection

Minimum 600 words describing your project and connecting it to themes and readings from the class. This is your opportunity to talk about the “so what” of your project. This post should also include any challenges or setbacks. Post your reflection as a blog post on the Fashioning Circuits website. Make sure to use all of the affordances of the blog format to support your writing, including at least one image of your finished project.

Presentation

Completed projects should be presented in class. Length of presentation is TBD, dependent on which date the class chooses for the due date.

Grading

The final wearable project is worth 30% of your grade.

Excellent Very Good Satisfactory Needs Improvement Failing
Concept The wearable project takes a novel approach to a problem or issue. The proposal is well conceived, well written, and on time. The wearable project is designed with some complexity to address a problem or make a statement about a social issue. The proposal is well written and on time. The wearable project is conceived to address a problem or make a statement about a social issue. The proposal is complete and on time. The wearable project may lack a clear connection to a problem or issue. The proposal may be late or incomplete. The wearable project may lack complexity. The proposal may be late or incomplete.
Execution All components are well connected and the wearable object works as conceptualized. The appearance of the object successfully employs an aesthetic strategy. All components are well connected. The object works as conceptualized or the plan has been modified in a way that still supports the concept. The appearance of the object has an aesthetic strategy. All components are connected. The wearable object works. The appearance of the object has a mostly uniform appearance. Components may not be properly connected or the object may not have full functionality. The appearance of the object may be irregular. Components are missing or not connected. The appearance of the object may be highly irregular.
Troubleshooting The student engages in troubleshooting and is able to articulate and address the cause of any issues. The student engages in troubleshooting and is able to articulate or address the cause of any issues. The student engages in troubleshooting but can neither articulate nor address the cause of any issues. The student does not engage in troubleshooting.
Reflection The blog post is well written and fully describes the project and relates the concept and execution to class themes or readings. Any challenges or failures are fully theorized and used as an opportunity for learning. The affordances of the blog format are used to enhance the writing. The blog post is well written and fully describes the project. Challenges or failure are addressed in a meaningful way. The affordances of the blog format are used to support the writing. The blog post is clearly written and fully describes the project, including any challenges or failures. The post includes the affordances of the blog format. The blog post may have writing issues, lack details about the project, or neglect challenges or failures. The post may not include any of the affordances of the blog format. The blog post may be short of the minimum word count or may be poorly written. The blog post may not include any of the affordances of the blog format.

The following will negatively impact your grade:

  • Submitting items late, including your supply order
  • Failure to present your project to the class

Timeline:

  • October 29 – Proposal due
  • November 5 – Receive feedback
  • November 12 – Supplies ordered
  • December 19, 11am – 1:45pm – Project and Reflection due and presented in class

Late Work:

  • Late proposals or supply orders will result in 1/3 of a letter grade deduction.
  • Late finished projects or reflection posts will result in the loss of one full letter grade for each day they are late.
  • Presentations may not be conducted late.

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