Dec 072014
 

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It is acknowledgeable that throughout human history, people have always recognized and maintained a sense of privacy. Nestled betwixt a plethora of issues facing this realization is the idea that there does not exist a single and precise definition of what exactly privacy constitutes. Dated research (circa 1881) presented an oversimplified yet often quoted idea that privacy was the “right to be let alone” (Craven Jr, 1979). It wasn’t until a few years later that the idea that privacy deserved legal protection began to circulate, spawning mass intellectual debates on the issue. Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis produced a highly influential essay in Harvard Law Review in 1890 that introduced the fundamental principle that “the individual shall have full protection in person and in property… it is our purpose to consider whether the existing law affords a principle which can properly be invoked to protect the privacy of the individual; and, if it does, what the nature and extent of such protection is” (p. 37). In American society, as well as other western cultures, one of the most clear cut and expected notions of privacy involves the ability to control exposure of one’s body (Konvitz, 1966). The author discusses how culturally we are made to believe that being naked is something to be seen as shameful (as passages from the bible give way to this), and we have a right to not be exposed without or consent. While this project doesn’t focus on the distribution of anything pertaining to a violation of someone’s right to maintain privacy of their naked body, it does touch on having a right to not be publicly displayed to others, whether it be in concern to their body, clothing, etc., within certain public or private spheres without their consent. In discussing video voyeurism, Lance Rothenberg said, “The failure of criminal law to recognize a legitimate expectation of privacy in the public space tacitly grants the video voyeur a license to act with impunity, and leaves victims with little or no recourse” (2011, p. 1146). Voyeurism in this case is the action of spying on persons engaged in intimate behavior, such as undressing or other sexual activity considered to be private nature.

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Sep 212014
 

 By: Benaiah Ely

Photo courtesy of www.LiveAthos.com

Athos performance wear
Photo courtesy of www.LiveAthos.com

As the age of information progresses, people and organizations alike are benefitting from the ease at which they can access information pertaining to nearly everything via the internet. The development and continued use of social networks in particular has given people the chance to either share or receive knowledge regarding technologies, fashion, events and even health advice with others. Because of this, at least in part, there has been an increase in the formation of groups focused on increasing health awareness and the active decision to lead a life filled with healthy decisions. We’ve seen groups, almost recognizable as subcultures, form and gain mass participation as part of this process. Recognizable names, such as P90X or CrossFit, come to mind. Part of the appeal of said groups is that pretty much anyone can join.

So why wouldn’t everyone partake in such groups? As modern media outlets, particularly in the United States, continue to place an emphasis on maintaining a ‘fit’ and ‘toned’ exterior, it is not unreasonable to think that almost anyone would want to be part of such an active culture. So why aren’t they? It begins with establishing the basis for being able to participate in such groups. People need to be able to accomplish at least minor physical achievements to have the foundation to keep up with the aforementioned groups. It is likely that this can be accomplished by semi regular visits to a gym or fitness facility. But, as some people may know from personal experience, it isn’t always that simple. Gym phobias can set in, or rather, fears that often stem from working out in front of others. Often, these fears are due simply to a lack of information. What workouts are the best for me? Which exercises should I do to target specific muscles? How do I know I’m doing the workouts right? These are all legitimate questions, likely faced by many of us. To overcome this, some seek the opinions or expertise of those who are well versed in exercise. An entire business has been founded on this idea, as personal trainers or fitness instructors have become an integral part of any gym. What do they do exactly? Well, they more or less tell the individual which workouts to do, how to perform the exercises in an optimal manner, and encourage the participant throughout the workout. It is a noble practice and an often necessary one. Even some of the most avid exercise fanatics will admit that monitoring your own exercises to make sure they’re being performed optimally can be a difficult task. Thus, the need for a personal trainer is only heightened. Right?

Feeling similar frustrations, Dhananja Jayalath and Christopher Wiebe, two gym-goers frustrated with their routines, decided to take action. Together, they “set out on a mission to help people improve their lives by providing actionable insights without disrupting their existing routines.” Essentially, the two individuals combined digital technology and performance wear to create clothing that will, in a sense, become your personal trainer. Thus, Athos was born. Continue reading »